Upcoming Events

Unravelling the best-kept secret in Physics A free workshop for science teachers during the British Science Week 2023 Geophysics is the application of physics to the Earth, and is shortlisted by the UK government as being a profession in high demand . Data collected both from the Earth’s surface and from space and the application…
22-28 June 2023: Campus Activities Free events in the School of Earth and Environment for A-level Geology students and their teachers. Planned activities include: Mineralogy 101 in our dedicated geology teaching space with hands in access to our world-class teaching collection and petrographic microscope resources. A tour of our Virtual World digital mapping tool and…

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This workshop combines science and art, and explores the development of colour pigments in the past and present. Students will draw on the history of natural and chemical dyes at the University and examples from Leeds chemical collection in order to create their own pigments for painting. This session is suitable for KS3 pupils For further information on Festival events and…
What chemicals are contained in your shopping and why are they used? Our interactive mix of demonstrations and quiz questions will answer this and more. This session links to states of matter, physical and chemical changes, and particle behaviour. This session is suitable for KS3 pupils. For further information on Festival events and booking details, please click…
Students will enjoy a day full of physics, but not the physics they’ll expect! First they’ll explore the many aspects of light by creating their own pieces of media art. Next they’ll investigate the world of medical physics and end with a talk from Professor David Evans about recreating the Big Bang with the World’s Largest Machine – the Large Hadron Collider at…
The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), situated at CERN near Geneva, is the World’s most powerful particle accelerator. Here, protons are smashed together at practically the speed of light recreating the violent particle collisions which would have existed less than a billionth of a second after the Big Bang. Lead nuclei are accelerated and collided producing the highest temperatures and densities ever made in an…
Students will enjoy a day full of physics, but not the physics they’ll expect! First they’ll explore the many aspects of light by creating their own pieces of media art. Next they’ll investigate the world of medical physics and end with a talk from Professor David Evans about recreating the Big Bang with the World’s Largest Machine – the Large Hadron Collider at…
See the amazing animals and plants of Britain in the time of the dinosaurs! Pupils will see fascinating fossils from our collection, talk to palaeontologists, draw and paint pictures of the animals, and write a short story imagining the Mesozoic world. This session is suitable for KS3 pupils For further information on Festival events and booking details, please click here
Everyone knows that The Simpsons is the most successful show in television history, but few know that its gang of mathematically gifted writers have used the show to explore everything from calculus to geometry, pi to game theory and infinitesimals to infinity. Simon Singh, author of Fermat’s Last Theorem, Big Bang and The Code Book, discusses his latest book and explores the mathematical ideas…
This talk will explain how physics at the most fundamental level is actually very simple. In particular, the remarkable fact that most of the physics we experience every day can be explained by thinking about the symmetries of the simplest geometrical shape: the circle. Audience participation required! Study of A level physics or maths recommended. This session is suitable for KS5 pupils For…
It is possible to shuffle a pack of cards so that the cards from two halves are perfectly alternated. While this shuffle looks perfectly fair, it is almost as unfair as you can get. The shuffler can work out the destination of each card and, with a bit of thought, can deal winning hands of cards effortlessly. The possibilities in cheating and…
It’s not only mountaineers, scouts, and sailors who study knots. The mathematical question of determining whether two knots are really the same turns out to be surprisingly deep and difficult. This subject also has numerous and diverse applications, from the knotting of our own DNA to quantum physics. This session is suitable for KS5 pupils For further information on Festival events…